Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot (1959)

(Source: ourmarilynmonroe, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

Timestamp: 1413667908

Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot (1959)

(Source: ourmarilynmonroe, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

Do you know about trouble dolls? I think they’re Guatemalan, and they’ve been given to me a lot over the years. The years in Peru, the years in Santa Fe—the floors and the ledges and the shelves were littered with trouble dolls, and my life was littered with trouble. Supposedly, you can pick up these little, handmade, beautiful dolls and tell them your worries, your troubles, then place them in their box and they will worry for you. So you can get some sleep. Well, I put all my troubles in cocaine and booze and heroine and pot and guns and pussy. Those were my trouble dolls. I should have confided in the dolls—the little, handmade ones—more often.

I have a point. I swear I do.

Marilyn was like a trouble doll for a lot of people: A lot of people needed her because she was beautiful and she was sweet and she was pretty much what a lot of people believed was a perfect woman—a sexual machine with a heart. And a lot of people needed her because they wanted her to fail or to cry or to die, because they wanted to believe that all of her gifts—physical and otherwise—wouldn’t save her or make her happy. So the ugly and the mean-spirited could feel better about their lives and their various lacks. And a lot of people looked at her and saw money and sex and power and an evil sort of joy that comes from getting off. She was a product, a commodity to them. And a lot of people needed her because she so clearly needed a friend, needed some love, and a lot of people really wanted to give this to her.

So Marilyn Monroe was this creamy, sweet, beautiful trouble doll for a lot of people, and we whispered to her image or her memory and told her what we needed, what we desired, and then we believed that things would happen or change.

And she got put in her box and was put on an eternal shelf, where we can continue to ask of her what we need.

-Dennis Hopper in an interview with James Grissom [x]

(Source: mostlymarilynmonroe, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

Timestamp: 1413667811
Do you know about trouble dolls? I think they’re Guatemalan, and they’ve been given to me a lot over the years. The years in Peru, the years in Santa Fe—the floors and the ledges and the shelves were littered with trouble dolls, and my life was littered with trouble. Supposedly, you can pick up these little, handmade, beautiful dolls and tell them your worries, your troubles, then place them in their box and they will worry for you. So you can get some sleep. Well, I put all my troubles in cocaine and booze and heroine and pot and guns and pussy. Those were my trouble dolls. I should have confided in the dolls—the little, handmade ones—more often.

I have a point. I swear I do.

Marilyn was like a trouble doll for a lot of people: A lot of people needed her because she was beautiful and she was sweet and she was pretty much what a lot of people believed was a perfect woman—a sexual machine with a heart. And a lot of people needed her because they wanted her to fail or to cry or to die, because they wanted to believe that all of her gifts—physical and otherwise—wouldn’t save her or make her happy. So the ugly and the mean-spirited could feel better about their lives and their various lacks. And a lot of people looked at her and saw money and sex and power and an evil sort of joy that comes from getting off. She was a product, a commodity to them. And a lot of people needed her because she so clearly needed a friend, needed some love, and a lot of people really wanted to give this to her.

So Marilyn Monroe was this creamy, sweet, beautiful trouble doll for a lot of people, and we whispered to her image or her memory and told her what we needed, what we desired, and then we believed that things would happen or change.

And she got put in her box and was put on an eternal shelf, where we can continue to ask of her what we need.

-Dennis Hopper in an interview with James Grissom [x]

(Source: mostlymarilynmonroe, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

Rare photographs of Marilyn during the filming of the Jack Benny Program which aired on 13 September 1953.

(Source: mostlymarilynmonroe, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Timestamp: 1413667749

Rare photographs of Marilyn during the filming of the Jack Benny Program which aired on 13 September 1953.

(Source: mostlymarilynmonroe, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

(Source: yournaoko, via vintageladies)

thebeautyofmarilyn:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Gene Kornman, 1952.

(via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Timestamp: 1413667664

thebeautyofmarilyn:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Gene Kornman, 1952.

(via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Marilyn Monroe in 1957 © Richard Avedon.

(Source: eternalmarilynmonroe, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Timestamp: 1413667648

Marilyn Monroe in 1957 © Richard Avedon.

(Source: eternalmarilynmonroe, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Greta Garbo, 1931

(Source: euxinus, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

Timestamp: 1413667634
Greta Garbo, 1931

(Source: euxinus, via thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

January 1st 1953: Marilyn Monroe at the Cinerama Party at the Coconut Grove nightclub.

(Source: elsiemarina, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Timestamp: 1413667614

January 1st 1953: Marilyn Monroe at the Cinerama Party at the Coconut Grove nightclub.

(Source: elsiemarina, via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Nickolas Murray, 1952.

(via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

Timestamp: 1413667597

perfectlymarilynmonroe:

Marilyn photographed by Nickolas Murray, 1952.

(via allaboutmarilynmonroe)

thequeenofpinup:

My #pinup vest with most of my favorite ladies #BettiePage #MarilynMonroe #Vampira is done for the most part. I made that Bettie back patch out of an old t-shirt! Just wanna add that I’ve searched high and low for that Deadly Dames by @michelinepitt dress for YEARS and finally found it thanks to @tessmunster 🙌💕 #pinupgirlclothing #TessMunster

Timestamp: 1407724049

thequeenofpinup:

My #pinup vest with most of my favorite ladies #BettiePage #MarilynMonroe #Vampira is done for the most part. I made that Bettie back patch out of an old t-shirt! Just wanna add that I’ve searched high and low for that Deadly Dames by @michelinepitt dress for YEARS and finally found it thanks to @tessmunster 🙌💕 #pinupgirlclothing #TessMunster

thequeenofpinup:

The light was leaving, she seemed to fade with it. Blend with the sky and clouds, proceed beyond them. I wanted to lift my voice louder than the seagulls cries and call her back. Marilyn! Marilyn! Why did everything have to turn out the way it did?

-Truman Capote on the day Marilyn died

RIP, my love.

June 1st 1926 - August 5th 1962

Marilyn photographed by Cecil Beaton, 1956.

Timestamp: 1407215817

thequeenofpinup:

The light was leaving, she seemed to fade with it. Blend with the sky and clouds, proceed beyond them. I wanted to lift my voice louder than the seagulls cries and call her back. Marilyn! Marilyn! Why did everything have to turn out the way it did?

-Truman Capote on the day Marilyn died

RIP, my love.

June 1st 1926 - August 5th 1962

Marilyn photographed by Cecil Beaton, 1956.

damsellover:

Vampira in Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959)

(via the-vampira-show)

Timestamp: 1406860563

damsellover:

Vampira in Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959)

(via the-vampira-show)

ohmypinups:

Mosh

(Source: )

Timestamp: 1406860483

ohmypinups:

Mosh

(Source: )

Marilyn by Earl Moran in 1948.

Timestamp: 1406860450

Marilyn by Earl Moran in 1948.